15 Things people forget to tell you to pack on the camino de santiago

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Enshrinement to the relics of Apostle James 

I researched, and then researched some more when it came to creating the perfect packing list that wouldn’t break my back (literally) on the Camino de Santiago de Compostela in Spain. The Camino is a historic 500-mile pilgrimage that has it’s pilgrims walking an average of 10-15 miles a day, carrying all of their supplies on their person (unless you use a backpack service such as Xacotrans). 


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With under 20 lbs in my Osprey Porter- 46 Liter backpack, I thought I surmised the creme de la creme of contents, complete with a box of Clif Bars to calorically sustain me due to allergies (check out my article on traveling the camino being gluten and dairy free).  With that said, there were items that I didn’t think of to pack, which either were not listed on any of the camino resource websites or not recommended at all.  However, with a good dose of trial and error, and with 20/20 hindsight, I found the following items to be necessities.  After I sent out a survey to fellow peregrinos (pilgrims), who I met along The Way, about their experience, I have comprised the following list of items you may want to consider making room for on your Camino:

1) BED BUG SPRAY

Sadly, bed bugs are a very real thing on the Camino, and they are a pilgrim’s worst nightmare (other than foot blisters).  It can not only slow them down, but it can even prematurely send them home if they have a bad enough case.  They also spread like wild fire.  This is why I recommend a bed bug spray to use immediately on the beds when you arrive at albergues, hostelerias, hostels, pensions, paradors, camping, hotels, etc.  We weren’t attacked on the Camino, but I came across plenty of pilgrims who were.  In trying to avoid the same thing happening to us, we looked and looked for spray, but couldn’t find any.  At one point, we asked a pharmacist who responded, “No tenemos chinches en Espana!” (We don’t have bed bugs in Spain!). though I offended her, and her country.  Oh well.  In my heart of hearts, I think evading any sort of infestation was all due to doTERRA’s essential oils, historically and naturally used as repellent, due to their strong scent. Which leads us to the next item.



2/3) DOTERRA ESSENTIAL OIL KEY CHAIN AND ESSENTIAL OILS

 

In consulting with my essential oils guru friend, Virginia, this 8-vial keychain allowed me to take the following recommended oils with me.. :

  • Lavender (two vials worth!)–  I don’t have enough good things to say about lavender. It’s a bed bug preventative, blister aid (!!!), great for rashes, sunburn, stress, and helps you somewhat sleep through the snores and ongoing flatulence heard and smelled in the albergues. I would also usually put lavender or peppermint on pilgrims with bites, which seemed to soothe these areas.
  • OnGuard-  For immunity against sore throats that can occur after walking in the cold and through torrential rain. It’s also naturally warming, and can be used as a hand wash when mixed with water.  I would throw this on each time I, or someone else mentioned that they were feeling like something was coming on.
  • Melaleuca/Eucalyptus-  Good for blisters, wound care, rashes and also a natural antiseptic.
  • Peppermint (two vials worth!)-  Like lavender, I don’t have enough to say about about peppermint, which is why I brought two vials worth.  It’s naturally cooling, can be used as a breath freshener, and is great for headaches, nausea, congestion and motion sickness.  I usually would start my day by putting a drop in my mouth, and behind my neck to wake me up.
  • Digestzen-  Good for constipation, diarrhea, and upset stomach. Just saying!
  • TerreShield-  Bug preventative! Need I say more?
  • I also brought doTERRA’s Deep Blue roll-on, because it’s fantastic for sore muscles, and also makes you smell like you just took a shower: a Camino rarity.. BUG BITE SOOTHING CREAM (IVEREST) – If you are prone to mosquito or other bug bites, like moi (it’s because I’m so sweet. ha.)… Then this is the truly the best thing out there, and the only cream that actually quells the itch.  My friend Laurie gifted this to me prior to the Camino, and thought it serve as dead weight in my backpack, but it ended up being quite the contrary.  I, and many other peregrinos squeezed the living light out of this cream over the course of our pilgrimage.



4) LUSH TOOTHY-TABS 

Light box of tooth paste tabs, rather than an entire tube of heavy toothpaste. Did I mention that they are light weight? Someone on the Camino had them, and I thought it was ingenious addition.


5) SRIRACHA2GO

 

food camino de santiago spain travel dejavu travel blogging

I’m not saying Spanish food is bland.. But I’m not saying it isn’t. Living in California, I am blessed to have diverse cuisine at my fingertips.  And in visiting the bigger cities on the Camino, I was sad to see that there were often few if any restaurants that weren’t Spanish.  How many different ways can you make paella? Sheesh!  With that said, I kept thinking, most of the meals would exponentially taste better if they had Sriracha drizzled on them.  This Sriracha key chain would have worked just fine.

Don’t forget to check out this Travel Poem, If you’re a globetrotter.

6) RAIN SOCKS (DEXSHELL ULTRALIGHT WATERPROOF SOCKS)

 

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Depending on when you decide to complete the Camino, you may have to deal with some torrential and potentially very cold rain… And I mean, pouring rain that leaves your feel standing in a perennial pool of water, and then being forced to sit a bar you don’t want to be in, just so that you can wait for your shoes and socks to dry.  It’s part of the experience, yeah yeah.. But getting bronchitis, like I did at the very end (luckily) could have maybe been prevented with a pair of rain socks to go over my regular socks, like some of the other pilgrims had. Side note: how is it that in Spain you can purchase Xanax, or other like drugs over the counter, that are under lock and key here is the US, but you can’t purchase antibiotics without a doctor’s prescription? Seems like they need to get their priorities in order.




7) RAIN PANTS (COLUMBIA STORM SURGE) 

Did I mention torrential rain, and drenched legs? A rain coat only covers so much, my friends. 


8) LIGHT SHORTS (PATAGONIA BARELY BAGGIES)

 

camino de santiago pilgrimage spain travel dejavu

Shorts that can be worn both during your walk and at night in bed, in early spring and even in the fall (walking for miles will make anyone feel warm).  Albergues will sometimes turn up the heat, and or not have great ventilation. These shorts will prevent feeling overheated, and are great for wearing straight out of the shower. 


9) ADDITIONAL SILK SLEEPING LINER/PILLOW CASE (COCOON SILK TRAVELSHEET)  

Sometimes it’s difficult to come across a laundromat, or an albergue with a washer AND dryer (I still don’t understand why dryers are such a rare commodity in N. Spain).  And 10 hours is by no means enough drying time for your clothing, and/or liners, which is why some pilgrims will go a few days or weeks without washing anything.  This is why additional sleeping supplies are a necessity, plus they are relatively light. 


10) SOCKS (SMARTWOOL LIGHT HIKING SOCKS)  

And I mean 5-6 pairs! Why? You are walking an average of 10-15 miles a day, and didn’t you just read about dryers being a rare commodity? Also, the torrential rain? Plus, you may want to layer on in order to prevent blisters.


11) A REAL TOWEL (TURKISH PESTEMEL TOWEL) 

Not some microfiber ‘travel’ towel that is so itchy you’d rather air dry naked in front of of your fellow peregrinos. But a soft, lightweight, absorbent towel.  This is one of the few luxuries you should afford yourself on this trip.




12) WIPES (COTTONELLE FRESH CARE) 

Need to take a quick bird bath? Wipe off some, or lots, of sweat? Clean your hands? Or, clean yourself post nourishing some plants (pee, etc.)? Then carry wipes with you! 


13) TEA (GOOD EARTH SWEET AND SPICY)  

Are you a tea person? A person who can’t live without tea, not including Lipton? Then I would bring a box, or two with you.  Though, keep in mind, markets in the bigger cities will have options for you too. 


14) DOWNLOADABLE APP (CAMINO FRANCES- A WISE PILGRIM GUIDE)

 

camino de santiago app pilgrimage spain travel dejavu travel blogging

For those walking the Camino Frances, I found out about this app a quarter of the way through, and kicked a rock for not finding out about it sooner. Not only does it work offline, but it gives you a history of each town, city and village you pass through.  There is a an accommodation directory (over 900 options on the Camino)  that found me gems of albergues off the beaten track, and options to book online with some too. If GPS is enabled, it will actually display the distance from every point within the app (albergue, church, city, bar, etc.) including photographs, maps (elevation too!), and comments from other peregrinos. Now go download it!


15) VASELINE

It was too late before I finally realized that the peregrinos using vaseline underneath their socks were the one without blisters, not limping, and not buying second skin products such as Compeed at every stop.  Plus they did not have to stay an extra day or two in town to let their foot/feet  heal, or even worse, have to return home due to a severe infection.  Do yourself a favor, and liberally apply vaseline to your feet before throwing on socks for the day.  More info: http://coolhikinggear.com/using-vaseline-to-prevent-foot-blisters 


I hope this list serves to be helpful to you, or anyone you know interested in the Camino. For any other questions related to the Camino, and/or essential oils, feel free to e-mail me at buenqamino@gmail.com

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Por siempre, Buen Camino!  🙂 

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Christina Kantzavelos

It only took her two masters degrees, and journaling an entire pilgrimage (Camino de Santiago) to realize her love for writing and the need to share it with others. To follow more of her writing, visit www.buenqamino.com or follow her on social media, @buenqamino!

Comments

  1. I’m walking the Camino at the moment!!! 22 days in and only have 200 km togo!! I would highly suggest some ointment for chaffing!!! I had a tube of A and D ointment, used in America for diaper rash, burns ext… It has been a life saver for the guys in my group!! They would literally fight over it!!! Had a few girls ask for it as well but the guys used it the most!!

    • Hola Heather,

      Thank you for taking the time to read this post, and to even offer another valuable recommendation. I can only picture a bunch of men fighting over some ointment, and it makes me laugh.

      Also, congrats on being 22 days in! The Camino is something you will forever remember quite fondly, and look forward to (perhaps not at this very moment) returning back to.

      Gracias, y Buen Camino!

      Christina, http://www.buenqamino.com

  2. I brought a fraction of these suggestions and had a wonderful Camino–twice! The less “stuff” you bring, the better.

    • Hola Jennifer,

      I agree that less is more on the Camino. But depending on the person, bringing/forgetting certain items can make or break you. This is why I held a survey with fellow pilgrims, to find out what those items were for everyone.

      Thanks for reading, y Buen Camino!

    • Can only agree, less stuff – merino socks, good boots, etc. We walked Camino frances 56 days and no bed bugs and thought cleaning practices were excellent in all the alburgues in which we stayed. We had not put chemicals all over our gear. Just check your mattress and seams first.
      I took a light weight wine corkscrew and this was an excellent extra 🙂

  3. I agree that some of these ideas may be helpful, but would like to offer some alternative ideas. Indeed there is no need to carry a heavy tube of toothpaste –instead buy one or two of the 1.5 oz. travel size tubes — you only need a dab.
    I’m sure that the author only gave one example of what was offered, but most of the Camino Frances is not within the regions where one can expect to have good paella. If you do want paella, try somewhere near the coast — like Barcelona or Santiago. Instead seek out the local foods — amazing soups, for example.
    Lavender has not been proven to protect against bedbugs (check out the CDC.gov for recommendations). I suggest spraying your backpack and the outside of your sleeping bag with Permetrin before you leave. Keep things within your backpack in ziplock of other plastic bags. Check your bedding.
    I do my laundry every day on the Camino and it has been a rare time when everything was not dry by morning (on the line). Sox take the longest to dry, but I think anything beyond 3 pair is unnecessary weight. I carry a sleeping bag or sleepquilt, but if I were to carry a sleepsheet, I can’t see why more than one would be necessary (If you need a dryer, wait until you get to a town that has one.)
    I wear trail runners and carry Sealskinz (waterproof socks) only when rain is likely — such as on the Norte, Primitivo, or LePuy (any time) and the Frances in the Spring.

    • Hola Susan,

      Thank you for reading, and even offering some suggestions, such as carrying smaller tubes of toothpaste and keeping items in separate bags within your backpack. Always a great idea!

      In terms of food, specifically Paella, I am referring to what is eaten on the Camino Frances, the most popular route. Cuisine in the larger cities is argued to be of more variety and better, but isn’t an option during the actual Camino. Hence why for me, a squirt of Sriracha would’ve done the trick.

      I understand that Lavender hasn’t been scientifically proven to prevent bug bites, which is why I first recommended a chemical prevention method (like Permethrin). However, I will say that we were some of the few without any bites, who used lavender religiously (and smelled really good while we were at it). In addition, it has other therapeutic benefits.

      Last but not least, laundry. I completed the Camino in late Fall, and this was a HUGE issue for us, because it rained a lot of the time. Hence, why I mentioned that some of the items on the list are really applicable to when there is torrential rain. Laundry wouldn’t probably be an issue in late Spring, or Summer because of the heat. Thus, you wouldn’t need rain socks or pants, or extra bedding during that time.

      Thanks again, y Buen Camino!

  4. What a terrific idea! I have a few friends who have walked The Camino, and I’m certain they would have loved to have a reference like this. I admire your tenacity in completing the entire pilgrimage! As a fellow traveller, I appreciate the thoughtfulness you put into writing this piece. I’ll be sure to share it with any friends considering walking The Camino in the future. Many Blessings.

  5. Really helpful list! I’d love to walk the Camino someday soon. 🙂

  6. Don’t forget the comfy undies. I love my eXofficio undies for long walks. One day I’ll get to walk the camino

  7. The Camino de Santiago is something I would like to do in the future! The vaseline tip is a great idea! I’m gonna try that one in the future!

    • It’s a great trick! Thanks for reading, and Buen Camino 🙂

    • I used Vaseline. I recommend it highly. I also used toe socks – those socks which separate each toe – they prevent rubbing and chafing. On inclement and cool days, I used these as liners and wore hiking socks over. I had absolutely no foot issues. Buen Camino!

  8. Thanks for this list. Just to clarify, the reason that you need a doctor to prescribe antibiotics, in Europe, is because they have been massively overused resulting in the development of resistant bacteria, like MRSA.This can literally be a killer. Perhaps it is not a problem in USA? Better to not self medicate with them, as they are specific to particular bacteria and useless for viral infections. A good antiseptic, like betadine, is much more useful. Also wipes- these can be really bad for the environment. Just use water!
    Sorry if this seems picky, just 2 subjects I feel strongly about.

    • Hola Amorel,

      Thank you for reading. No, you don’t sound picky.. Just passionate. Thank you for also clarifying why a prescription is needed for antibiotics, and not for other medications in Europe. It boggled my mind while I was there, and it didn’t help that he pharmacists I asked about this topic, just responded “it’s the new rule.” Your explanation makes complete sense.

      Wipes- I’m aware that they are not the most environmentally friendly. But, if you are many walking for miles/kms on end and need to use the restroom, without any facilities in site.. Water won’t help much, especially when you don’t have any clothing (that you can afford dirtying) to wipe yourself off with, and when you’re trying to hurry, because there are a group of pilgrims shortly behind you, and then more behind them. Water can also make you chafe from the friction, a further nuisance that you can’t afford when you are once again, walking for a very long distance. For us to reach middle-ground, and to offer some harm reduction on this topic, I found three different types of eco-friendly wipes one could choose to use: http://www.inhabitots.com/3-eco-friendly-wipe-picks/

      Thanks again, y buen camino!

      • and speaking as someone who lives along the camino and daily cleans up after thoughtless pilgrims: DON’T LEAVE TOILET PAPER/WIPES BEHIND WHEN YOU LEAVE. They do not vanish. The wind catches them, animals move them around, you leave an awful sight for everyone coming along behind you, sometimes for several months.
        Carry a ziplock bag and pack out your toilet paper and wipes, drop them in the next dumpster along the Way. You carried this stuff in, you can carry it out.

  9. A few quibbles: When my wife and I walked (Camino Frances, and Le Puy) we each had two pairs of light shorts, and a pair of tights. If needed for warmth we would wear the tights under shorts. Rather than rain jacket/pants, we just used a poncho (real ones, rather than those short light plastic things) Even in a cold rain we thought a full rain suit was too hot. (we walked in early fall)
    As you no doubt noticed, the trail is strewn with toilet paper, and your wipes would just increase the problem. Please, Please, Please (not to be sexist, but women in particular) Please carry a heavy duty small plastic bag and put the used paper in it — empty the bag later in a garbage can. Frankly, the amount of toilet paper strewn across 500 miles of northern Spain is dismaying. And add some strong safety pins to your list: Sometimes clothes pins are in short supply at the albergues, and if your laundry doesn’t dry overnight, you can pin your damp socks to your pack — if it isn’t raining they’ll dry during your day’s walk.
    Carrying Sriracha or Tabasco is an excellent idea as is carrying a real towel. I carried a travel towel in both France and Spain — it finally sank in that I would rather dry off by rolling in bushes than to use a travel towel again. (and I think rolling in bushes would work better)
    But very well done, and I’d guess that everyone who has walked the Camino would have something to add or subtract from your list.

    • Hi DJA,

      Thanks for reading, and offering some of your own suggestions. I too had a very real/high quality/long poncho, but because I am perhaps tall and because there was torrential rain, it wasn’t able to cover my legs, ankles, and feet in protecting me from the rain. I am glad I had rain socks, and waterproof shoes for these types of days, but really could have used some light water resistant pants.

      As for discarding toilet paper or wipes, I should have noted in this article to never litter. We always carried a bag with us to carry our used products to the nearest trash. We would also often times also pick up trash we saw along the way.

      Pinning socks to your backpack is a great idea! Unfortunately, it mostly rained for us. But this would probably work great for other seasons.

      Thank you again for reading. And like you said, anyone could add or take away an item or two from this list. Thanks for contributing 🙂

      As always, Buen Camino!

      • Again, thanks for your contribution. Too bad about the rain on your walk. We had more rain when we walked Via Podiensis than we had in Spain, but even so — ten or twelve days and only three were memorably wet. If it had been rainier we probably would have looked for more protection. DJA

    • Re: tech towels. I found the suggestion elsewhere years ago and it was to every time you did a load of wash at home, to throw the tech towel in. So by the time I did my first camino my tech towel (PackTowl Ultralite) was as soft and absorbent as an old Turkish towel.

  10. While I love the idea of essential oils rather than strong chemicals, I’d like to remind everyone to please check in with those around you before using them. Essential oils function as medicines, and those near you can’t help but inhale them and thus receive the effects of the medicine even if it is not suitable for them. If I’d been sleeping next to you when you were using lavender, I would have ended up with a migraine for two days.

    • Hi Joy,

      Thanks for reading. I too am very sensitive to scent, and agree we should always be mindful of our neighbors and their potential allergies and sensitivities. With that said, unless you have a allergy to lavender and or other essential oils, a therapeutic-grade oil should not generate an adverse reaction. For this reason, Doterra and some other essential oils companies that carry therapeutic-grade oils are currently being used in hospitals across the USA. Versus, perfume/cologne scents which are generally not approved in a hospital setting, due to potential adverse reactions. More info: http://guardianlv.com/2013/07/hospitals-using-essential-oils-to-boost-productivity-and-health-video/

      I will also say, that I would take a low-quality lavender induced migraine over a ‘malodorous peregrino sleeping next to me’ induced migraine, any day… Or, over chemical spray, or bed bugs, for that matter. But that’s just my personal preference 🙂

      Thanks for reading, and responding !

      • Hi Christina,

        Thank you for your reply. I agree that essential oils can be highly effective for some people, and I would use them if I could. However, regardless of the grade, essential oils can cause negative effects in sensitive people. For me it’s the lavender itself that’s the problem, not the grade. The migraines I get from even brief exposure to lavender include severe and debilitating pain, nausea, dizziness, and vomiting. One of these migraines on the Camino would cause me to lose at least a day of walking. Clearly I would prefer the mild displeasure of sleeping next to a ‘malodorous peregrino’, for I could laugh that off and walk away in the morning.

        Essential oils can be a great way to avoid chemicals as long as consent is first obtained from those who will end up inhaling them. We wouldn’t give medicines orally without consent, and inhaled therapeutics need be treated with the same respect.

        • Joy, like I mentioned before, we should always be mindful of our neighbors, regardless of what we are spraying or putting on… Unfortunately, my personal migraines would stem from strong scents, and thus a lack of sleep from those who were malodorous, as well as those who smoked cigarettes (quite a few) and those who further wore strong perfume or cologne. But it’s all part of the Camino experience, I suppose. Thanks again for your input!

  11. Arthur Rogers : August 26, 2016 at 3:01 pm

    I can endorse the chaffing cream idea, but you can buy some Bepanten+ at any of the Pharmacies. I can also endorse the vaseline tip, used it extensively on my 2 Camino’s and thirdly I would suggest a sink plug (0ne that covers the hole rather than fit into it) I found that extremely helpful when either washing your gear out, or just washing oneself at the sink. Weighs extremely little and is indispensable! ¡Buen Camino y Ultreya! (everyone)!!

  12. […] Read on to know which are the 15 things people forget to tell you to pack on the Camino De Santiago.  […]

  13. Well…So much “extras” and not a “basic”. Not really usefull.

    About the spanish food… Do you realize you,re in front of one of the most amazing and renowned cuisine in the world? Bland??! Sorry but i thinks is sooo unfaire criticize it if you didin t make the minimum effort to read a bit about spanish culture/gastronomy. Everybody knows that each region in Spain have their own specialities…Do you have this is USA…? Because for mi there is Burgers, hot dogs and this BIO/Green part of a Hipster something. Paella is from Valencia and Costa of Levante! No one expect a paella in Camino o Galizia, o Pais Vasco…come on!! If you search about it carefully…you could find that Marisco and Pulpo is from Galizia, Cordero meat in the meseta is the best, Cecina in Leon, Morcilla in Burgos, Gazpacho and Mediterranean food in Andalucia, and Pan tomaquet and calzots in Catalunya, etc… You only have to looking for the good restaurants asking locals like any clever traveller do.
    Don,t blame the spanish gastronomy only because you had no idea….

    Sriracha ?? Put in you hot dog, we,re fine with our ali oli or olive oil 😉

    • Sonsoles,

      To start, I love Spanish cuisine. However, like any other other cuisine in the world.. you can only have so much of it, before it becomes homogenous, and you start to crave something different. In addition, when you live in a place that is as culturally diverse as a large US city, you will find a melting pot of various cuisines, and often you become accustomed to this daily variety. For example, living in San Diego, CA, anyone can enjoy eating three distinct cuisines in one day, from East African to Columbian, especially since we live on the border of Mexico and have so many ethnicities within our county. The ‘American cuisine’ you describe seems more like fast food, and is not my personal preference or a reflection of our own gastronomy. In fact, I think that it poorly represents the reality of how unique American cuisine can be since it is such a literal melting pot.

      While in Spain, I spoke with locals, ate with locals, and was open to the many wonderful aspects of Spanish cuisine. I tried the Marisco and Pulpo in Galicia and loved it. I ate the meat on the Meseta, Cocido Maragato in Astorga (wow!) and the Marcillo in Burgos and again, loved it all. But, you can only have so much of the ‘best of’ before you crave something different. For example, I remember meeting this Taiwanese couple who lived in Leon who said they have their family ship them various spices from back home, because there isn’t anything spicy to be found, or any Asian food for that matter, unless you visit the even larger cities in Spain, like Madrid or Barcelona. Would you say two locals spicing up their food is an attack on Spanish cuisine, or simply a way of garnishing it? We all want to enjoy what we like, and it does not in any way diminish the local flavors.

      I apologize if you felt like I was attacking Spanish cuisine. The spice/sriracha recommendation was felt by many of my fellow American and South Korean peregrinos and, let’s be honest, Sriracha is pretty good on just about everything! Speaking of, I have never heard of Sriracha on hot dogs, but I am open to trying it.

      Buen dia!

  14. Sonsoles,

    To start, I love Spanish cuisine. However, like any other other cuisine in the world.. you can only have so much of it, before it becomes homogenous, and you start to crave something different. In addition, when you live in a place that is as culturally diverse as a large US city, you will find a melting pot of various cuisines, and often you become accustomed to this daily variety. For example, living in San Diego, CA, anyone can enjoy eating three distinct cuisines in one day, from East African to Columbian, especially since we live on the border of Mexico and have so many ethnicities within our county. The ‘American cuisine’ you describe seems more like fast food, and is not my personal preference or a reflection of our own gastronomy. In fact, I think that it poorly represents the reality of how unique American cuisine can be since it is such a literal melting pot.

    While in Spain, I spoke with locals, ate with locals, and was open to the many wonderful aspects of Spanish cuisine. I tried the Marisco and Pulpo in Galicia and loved it. I ate the meat on the Meseta, Cocido Maragato in Astorga (wow!) and the Marcillo in Burgos and again, loved it all. But, you can only have so much of the ‘best of’ before you crave something different. For example, I remember meeting this Taiwanese couple who lived in Leon who said they have their family ship them various spices from back home, because there isn’t anything spicy to be found, or any Asian food for that matter, unless you visit the even larger cities in Spain, like Madrid or Barcelona. Would you say two locals spicing up their food is an attack on Spanish cuisine, or simply a way of garnishing it? We all want to enjoy what we like, and it does not in any way diminish the local flavors.

    I apologize if you felt like I was attacking Spanish cuisine. The spice/sriracha recommendation was felt by many of my fellow American and South Korean peregrinos and, let’s be honest, Sriracha is pretty good on just about everything! Speaking of, I have never heard of Sriracha on hot dogs, but I am open to trying it.

    Buen dia!

  15. […] Read on to know which are the 15 things people forget to tell you to pack on the Camino De Santiago.  […]

  16. Thank you son much for these suggestions! I will most certainly pack a comfy towel and I love the app suggestion. Thanks again!

  17. Why order paella on the Camino Frances? There are plenty of other tasty Spanish dishes that you don’t need to douse with American condiments.

    Every has their own Camino, but I agree with the pharmacist (who actally lives in Spain) and believe that the bites you saw on others could have been chiggers from the grass, not bed bugs. To me, a foodie and journalist who has walked 5 Caminos, your blog post sounds more like an advertorial for all the products that you mention. My experiences were WAY different.

    • Hi Stacey,

      Thank you for both reading and commenting on my article. As mentioned in the introduction, I have food allergies and Paella is a gluten-free dish. Not to mention, it wasn’t rare to find it on peregrino menus along the way. I would also see locals eating it at various restaurants on the Camino.

      In regards to bed bugs… I recently spoke to my friend who I met on the Camino, and recanted of our experiences. She mentioned that she had so many bites at one point, resulting in her being seen by a doctor in Leon, who confirmed that they were indeed bed bug bites. She said there were other peregrinos who confirmed the same. Bed bugs are unfortunately everywhere, and Spain isn’t immune. I have yet to hear or really read about anything regarding chiggers on the Camino. From what I’ve read, they mainly exist in hot/humid climates. Not to say they aren’t there. https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/tics-chiggers.18195/

      I apologize that my article seems advertorial to you. However, most ‘list-post’ articles/entries seem to. I know when I was conducting my own research in preparation for the Camino, I was appreciative to find posts with links attached to the items recommended. This helped me to compare and contrast what was out there.

      To quote you, everyone has their own Camino, and their own experience (as God intended). Neither is more right or more wrong than the other. Just like writers and their writing styles

      Thanks again, y Buen Camino!

      P.S. Sriracha is originally a Vietnamese/Thai condiment.

  18. Hi Stacey,

    Thank you for both reading and commenting on my article. As mentioned in the introduction, I have food allergies and Paella is a gluten-free dish. Not to mention, it wasn’t rare to find it on peregrino menus along the way. I would also see locals eating it at various restaurants on the Camino.

    In regards to bed bugs… I recently spoke to my friend who I met on the Camino, and recanted of our experiences. She mentioned that she had so many bites at one point, resulting in her being seen by a doctor in Leon, who confirmed that they were indeed bed bug bites. She said there were other peregrinos who confirmed the same. Bed bugs are unfortunately everywhere, and Spain isn’t immune. I have yet to hear or really read about anything regarding chiggers on the Camino. From what I’ve read, they mainly exist in hot/humid climates. Not to say they aren’t there. https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/tics-chiggers.18195/

    I apologize that my article seems advertorial to you. However, most ‘list-post’ articles/entries seem to. I know when I was conducting my own research in preparation for the Camino, I was appreciative to find posts with links attached to the items recommended. This helped me to compare and contrast what was out there.

    To quote you, everyone has their own Camino, and their own experience (as God intended). Neither is more right or more wrong than the other. Just like writers and their writing styles 🙂

    Thanks again, y Buen Camino!

    P.S. Sriracha is originally a Vietnamese/Thai condiment.

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